fundamentalist ghouls descend on a tragedy

December 15, 2012

god fossil

It seems that with every school shooting, there’s an almost inevitable parade of fundamentalists rushing to tell the world that we all as zealous about religious beliefs as they are, there would be no more gunmen bursting into schools and colleges and God would protect us all. If they really believe in this line of thought, the only thing I could possibly call them would be ghouls. Just take a minute to think what they’re saying. Their righteous, omnipotent deity who loves humans and thinks of them as his progeny is either powerless before secular laws or is willing to let children and young adults die just to make a point. It’s the classic theodicy problem posed by Epicurus. If the god is able but not willing to help, he’s downright malevolent and that’s the kind of deity that we’re being told should be praised and revered in public. That’s hardly a deity to worship.

Tragedies are supposed to make you question why they happen and what can be done to make sure they don’t happen again. But to the ghouls whose petty tyrant of a God won’t intervene in a dire situation they’re an excuse to proselytize rather than question their devotion. Instead of the hard thing to do, asking why their god would allow something like that, they blame humans for a deity’s shortfalls. Or at least that’s the only reason I can think of for their actions without having to resort to a more sinister explanation. They may see this tragedy as a chance to advance their ideology and opportunistically jumping on others’ grief to convert more followers to their cause, acting as the religious version of the ambulance chasing lawyer if you will. Either way, it takes a rather compromised set of morals to think that the non-intervening deity is in the right here.

[ illustration by Koren Shadmi ]

  • Paul451

    that we all as zealous about religious beliefs

    “that were we all…”

    It’s interesting that the amount of actual violence in the secular world, and the tolerance for things like rape and child abuse, has declined as religiosity has declined. I don’t know if there’s a direct correlation, or if there’s an external factor that has reduced both violence and religiosity. (Although that would imply that religion somehow sits in the same part of the brain/culture as violence and rape.)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=637320013 Donnamarie Hamilton-Ross

    The history of actions taken in the name of religion gives a sad correlation to all facets of violence.