quantum physics has a new way to blow your mind. it’s called quantum scarring
# science

quantum physics has a new way to blow your mind. it’s called quantum scarring

It turns out that some quantum systems don’t want to decay into their most chaotic state. Instead, they want to return to the state in which they started.


for the sake of the planet, stop exploring space?
# space

for the sake of the planet, stop exploring space?

The space exploration industry is booming, which is an encouraging sign for our future. But some pundits are arguing that rocket launches will exacerbate global warming.


behold the (terrifyingly badly designed) cyborg of the 1960s
# science

behold the (terrifyingly badly designed) cyborg of the 1960s

Humans have been thinking about modifying themselves to survive the rigors of space flight for a long time now. Thankfully, out ideas for how to do it have vastly improved.


and now a few (uncensored) words about climate change
# science

and now a few (uncensored) words about climate change

With the planet still heating up while politicians are either twiddling their thumbs or actively making things worse, prepare for conversations about climate change to have a very different tone.


world of weird things podcast: planes, trains, and automobiles (of the future)
# podcast

world of weird things podcast: planes, trains, and automobiles (of the future)

The Fishes debate the future of transportation and the likelihood that you'll be flying to work with your own, personal jetpack.

world of weird things podcast: is this the real life? is this just an alien simulation?
# podcast

world of weird things podcast: is this the real life? is this just an alien simulation?

According to some scientists, we may be stuck in some sort of alien version of The Matrix and never know it.

world of weird things podcast: greg accidentally builds baby skynet
# podcast

world of weird things podcast: greg accidentally builds baby skynet

Hide your kids, hide your wife, we're automating everybody out there!

world of weird things podcast: area 51, so hot right now
# podcast

world of weird things podcast: area 51, so hot right now

Memes and jokes about raiding Area 51 are taking over the internet. But what is Area 51, why is it so secret, and what would we really find if we ever made it inside?

a peek into the minds of your future robot overlords
# tech

a peek into the minds of your future robot overlords

Imagine a device from science fiction capable of creating a self-replicating, constantly improving robotic hivemind. I wanted to know if we could build one today. Then I sort of did.

the real reason why moon landing conspiracies endure
# space

the real reason why moon landing conspiracies endure

The idea that the lunar landing was faked has by now been debunked by just about everyone and their twice removed sister-in-law's grandma. So how and why is it still around?

world of weird things podcast: how to (profitably) defuse yellowstone
# podcast

world of weird things podcast: how to (profitably) defuse yellowstone

Supervolcanoes pose a dire threat to humanity, able to easily kill millions when they erupt with their full power, and there's nothing we can do to stop them. Or is there?

world of weird things podcast: keep quiet or the aliens will kill you?
# podcast

world of weird things podcast: keep quiet or the aliens will kill you?

Perhaps the most sinister explanation for why we haven't heard from aliens is that any civilization that reveals itself gets obliterated. But why? How? And how likely is that to happen?

world of weird things podcast: big bad pharma
# podcast

world of weird things podcast: big bad pharma

Big Pharma may not do much to endear itself to patients and the general public, but the last thing it wants to do is sit on cures for serious diseases. Here's why.

how an artificial intelligence learned to understand the universe
# science

how an artificial intelligence learned to understand the universe

For the first time, an AI was trained how to simulate a universe 600 million light years across. Does how fast it was able to do it and how well it understood its task tell us something profound about the cosmos?

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