do we know what actually causes autism?

A new study backs up the idea that autism is a genetic disorder by growing neurons in petri dishes.

kids walking

Anti-vaccine activists would have us believe that autism is the result of some sort of undefined, or scary sounding toxicity and should be cured by a gluten-free diet and detoxification typically conducted by a profiteering quack. However, the real scientific evidence points to genetics and brain development, meaning that no one develops autism or turns autistic, but is born this way and will fall at some point along the spectrum when the condition can be diagnosed. Recently, another study provided additional evidence for this theory by comparing how modified skin cell cultures taken from those with autism, reverted into stem cells, and induced to grow into micro brains developed to skin cells from their non-autistic parents, subjected to the same treatment. Right away, the researchers noted an over-abundance of inhibitory neurons which created the roadblocks to forming necessary connections for sensory and social input processing.

While this isn’t confirmation that this is in fact what causes autism, it’s a substantial step toward identifying the culprits. It also narrowed down the gene responsible and gave the researchers a good idea for how to control its expression. While some pop sci outlets trumpet this as work we can use to develop a cure for autism, I’m not so sure that it’s so simple. After all, autism isn’t a structural disorder in which an excess of inhibitory neurons blocks important functions and pills or even gene therapy would suddenly turn autistic individuals into neuro-typical ones. With their brains affected from birth, their lives have been built around their neurons compensating for all the neurotransmitter dead ends. It would take many years for their brains to re-wire themselves and fashion a new personality. And while those with severe autism would greatly benefit, would this be a desired, or even an ethical treatment for high functioning autistic people?

If autism shapes how you see the world and you have always had it, yes, it can make life really confusing and difficult. But when one learns to overcome, to recognize one’s problems and find coping mechanisms, the journey has made this person who he or she is today. It’s tempting, in the words of autism quacks to “fix” them, but considering how integral autism has been to how they became who they are, the “fix” in question would mean undoing a lifetime of learning, and in some way undoing what they are today for the ability to better process certain stimuli, social interactions, and better emotional coping skills. Again, for low functioning autistic people, there are arguments in favor of the benefits outweighing the risk, but for those who’ve learned to see this condition as a part of who they are and can easily function on their own, even benefiting a little from some of its positive side effects, being “cured” won’t always be the best choice…

# health // autism / biology / genetics / medical research


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